Fall 2017 HR Compliance Calendar

hr-compliance-calendarBelow is a summary of compliance requirements that took effect recently or will take effect over the next few months.

September 18

  • New version of I-9 form required. Employers must begin using a new version of the I-9 (dated 07/17/17) to verify an individual's identity and work authorization.

October 1

  • Connecticut expands protections for pregnant workers. Employers must make reasonable accommodations for pregnancy, childbirth or related conditions (including lactation), unless it would impose an undue hardship on the business.

  • Connecticut expands protections for veterans, National Guard members. Veteran status is added to the list of characteristics protected from discrimination and employees are entitled to job-protected leave if they are members of the National Guard of any other state (National Guard members of Connecticut were already protected).

  • Nevada requires reasonable accommodations for pregnancy. Employers with 15 or more employees must provide reasonable accommodations for pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition.

October 6

  • Oregon prohibits salary history inquiries. Employers are prohibited from inquiring into an applicant's salary history during the pre-hire process, screening an applicant based on current or prior compensation, and basing an applicant's compensation on prior salary history.

October 31

  • New York City restricts pay history inquiries. Employers are prohibited from asking applicants about, or relying on, their prior salary history at any stage during the hiring process.

November 1

  • Maine amends harassment training requirements. Employers with 15 or more employees must use a checklist to develop required sexual harassment training and all employers may be subject to penalties if they fail to provide certain notices relating to sexual harassment to employees.

  • Maine amends wage payment, rest break rules. Employers must provide at least 30 days' written notice before decreasing an employee's pay frequency, and an employee's 30-minute rest period may be used as unpaid mealtime as long as the employee is completely relieved of duty.

November 26

  • New York City scheduling ordinances become effective. New York City requires certain fast food and retail businesses to comply with certain scheduling and payroll deduction practices.

December 14

  • Delaware restricts pay history inquiries. Employers are generally prohibited from screening applicants based on their compensation history or seeking such information.

December 31

  • New York increases minimum wage. The state's minimum wage will increase as follows:

    Employees Who Work in New York City

    Employees Who Work in Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester Counties

    Employees Who Work in the Rest of the State

    Fast Food Workers (NYC)

    Employers with 11 or more employees: $13.00 per hour
    Employers with 10 or fewer employees: $12.00 per hour

    $11.00 per hour

    $10.40 per hour

    $13.50 per hour

  • New York increases minimum salary requirements for certain overtime exemptions. For the administrative and executive exemptions, the salary minimums, effective December 31, 2017, are shown below. Note: There are annual increases scheduled through 2021.

    NYC (11 or more employees)

    NYC (10 or less employees)

    Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester Counties

    Other NY Counties

    $975 per week

    $900 per week

    $825 per week

    $780 per week

  • North Carolina requires new notice. Employers must post a notice on the provisions of the recently enacted Employee Fair Classification Act in a conspicuous area of the workplace.

January 1, 2018

Note: This Compliance Calendar covers January 1 minimum wage increases for all applicable states and some of the larger U.S. cities. Additionally, several jurisdictions adjust their minimum wages annually for inflation, some of which haven't yet announced increases for January 2018. These jurisdictions include Alaska, Albuquerque (NM), Florida, Missouri, and Oakland (CA). Confirm the applicable minimum wage where your employees perform work.

  • Arizona increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $10.50 per hour.

  • California increases minimum wage. For employers with 26 or more employees, the minimum wage will increase to $11 per hour. For employers with 25 or fewer employees, the minimum wage will increase to $10.50 per hour.

  • California increases minimum pay requirements for certain overtime exemptions. For the administrative, professional, and executive exemptions, employers with 26 or more employees must pay a salary of at least $880 per week (two times the state minimum wage). Employers with fewer than 26 employees must pay a minimum salary of at least $840 (two times the state minimum wage) for these exemptions.

  • San Jose, CA increases minimum wage. The minimum wage increases to $13.50 per hour.

  • Colorado increases minimum wage. The minimum will increase to $10.20 per hour.

  • Connecticut wage withholding order requirements change. When an employee makes a claim for workers' compensation benefits, the employer must include a copy of the wage withholding order with the first report of occupational illness or injury to the insurance carrier.

  • Hawaii increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $10.10 per hour.

  • Maine increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $10.00 per hour.

  • Michigan increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $9.25 per hour.

  • Minnesota increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increases to $9.65 an hour for large employers (annual gross revenue of $500,000 or more) and $7.87 an hour for smaller employers (annual gross revenue of less than $500,000).

  • Minneapolis, MN increases minimum wage. For employers with more than 100 employees, the minimum wage increases to $10.00 per hour.

  • Montana increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $8.30 per hour.

  • Nevada requires domestic violence leave. Employers must provide domestic violence leave and make reasonable accommodations for an employee who is the victim of domestic violence or whose family or household member is a victim.

  • New Jersey increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $8.60 per hour.

  • New York entitles employees to paid family leave. All private employers with employees in the state of New York generally must purchase a paid family leave insurance policy or self-insure. The premium for the policy is funded solely by employees through a payroll deduction.

  • North Carolina amends rules for certain seasonal workers. Employers must pay non-exempt employees working for seasonal amusement or recreational establishments at least the state's current minimum wage of $7.25 per hour and 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek.

  • Ohio increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $8.30 per hour.

  • Oregon amends sick leave law. A new law amends, clarifies, and expands the state's sick leave requirements as well as the rules released by the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries.

  • Oregon adopts new rules on maximum hours for manufacturing employees. Manufacturing employers are generally prohibited from requiring employees to work more than 10 hours a day or 55 hours in a workweek. However, employees may voluntarily consent to work up to 60 hours in a workweek (but not more than 13 in a workday). The law also includes provisions that clarify daily and weekly overtime calculations for mills, factories, and manufacturing establishments.

  • Rhode Island increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $10.10 per hour.

  • South Dakota increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $8.85 per hour.

  • Vermont increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $10.50 per hour.

  • Vermont applies paid sick leave law to smaller employers. Employers with five or fewer employees working an average of 30 or more hours per week must allow employees to accrue leave. Larger employers were already subject to the sick leave law.

  • Vermont requires reasonable accommodations for pregnancy. Employers must provide reasonable accommodations to employees for pregnancy-related conditions unless it would impose an undue hardship on the business.

  • Washington increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $11.50 per hour.

  • Washington requires paid sick leave. Employees must accrue at least one hour of paid sick leave for every 40 hours worked. However, employers may frontload all of the paid sick leave employees are expected to accrue at the beginning of the year.

  • Seattle, WA increases minimum wage. Employers with 500 or fewer employees must pay employees who work in Seattle at least $14.00 per hour. Employers can satisfy this requirement through a combination of direct cash wages (of at least $11.50 per hour), tips, and medical benefits. Larger employers must pay employees who work in Seattle at least $15.45 per hour. Employers can satisfy this requirement through a combination of direct cash wages (of at least $15.00 per hour) and medical benefits.

  • Tacoma, WA increases minimum wage. The minimum wage will increase to $12.00 per hour.

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